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20131202
20131210
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CNBC 4
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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
CNBC
Dec 1, 2013 8:00pm EST
dying of liver and heart disease. >> in medicine, we have turned the laws of supply and demand upside down. >> what do you mean? >> supply drives its own demand. if you are running a hospital, you have to keep that hospital full of paying patients in order to, you know, meet your payroll, in order to pay off your bonds. >> so the more mri machines you have, the more people are going to get mri tests. >> absolutely. >> well, there are people that would argue this is great medicine that tested for every conceivable possible malady you might have. >> the best care may well be staying home with the trial of a new medication rather than being admitted to a hospital where you can be exposed to a hospital-acquired infection. we have a system that rewards much, much more care. >> in almost every business, cost-conscious customers and consumers help keep prices down but not with health care. and that's because the customers and consumers who are receiving the care aren't the ones paying the bill. >> the perverse incentives that exist in our system are magnified at end of life. >> david walker
CNBC
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
. in fact, it's the law. full-time workers in france are guaranteed at least five weeks vacation and a maximum 35-hour work week, with no paid overtime allowed. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. >> the aim is to keep your job without working. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. in this episode, we'll examine our relationship with work. how much is too much, too little, and who should decide? but before we look at the hours we spend on the job, we'll look at how employers tried to influence the way their workers act off the job. as morley safer reported in 2005, that cigarette or drink at home, that political candidate you supported, even your eating habits are coming under the scrutiny of your employer. if your boss doesn't approve, it might even cost you your job. >> anita epolito and cara stiffler were considered model employees at weyco, an insurance consulting firm outside of lansing, michigan. anita, 14 years on the job, cara, five. they sat side by side, sharing workloads and after work the occasional cigarette. but at a company benef
CNBC
Dec 1, 2013 11:00pm EST
, but to no smoking laws-- laws that have hurt big tobacco's bottom line. >> my take-home message from that is that these products have been developed for smokers to have a way to get their nicotine fix until they can get to the place where they can have their next cigarette. that is not going to help people stop smoking. [ticking] >> are smokeless products targeted at teenagers? you pulled together a group of high school students to discuss orbs. what did they tell you? >> one, it looks like candy. and who is candy made for? who is attracted to candy? we are, kids. >> when 60 minutes on cnbc returns in a moment. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. avo: thesales event "sis back. drive" whole grains... which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry,
CNBC
Dec 8, 2013 11:00pm EST
in this gray area of law and science, and there are plenty of patients eager to follow the trail he's blazing. the ones we talked to in las vegas, all eager to remain young and vital, consider this a lifestyle choice, and they're prepared to roll the dice. you aren't concerned that five years from now, somebody might do a study and find out that this regimen accelerates the growth of cancer cells or causes diabetes? >> well, that's happened with prescriptive drugs. i mean, has it not? so this is any-- in any field you're doing this. they're taken drugs off the market because of this. >> so you'd rather feel better now while you're living your life than worry about the possibly downside 10 or 15 years from now? >> you could get killed on the interstate tomorrow. i mean, my goodness. i mean, it's-- you have to weigh risks and rewards. you do that every day in life. you do it when you get up in the morning. >> are you sure, are you absolutely positive, absent any scientific studies, that the treatments that you're giving now won't prove to be detrimental to someone's health five, 10, 15 years fr
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4